Bait capsules with dead mice and acetaminophen (Tylenol) to poison brown tree snakes on Guam. (AP)

Bait capsules with dead mice and acetaminophen (Tylenol) to poison brown tree snakes on Guam. (AP)

Guam’s birds have been devoured by brown tree snakes. (USDA)

Guam’s birds have been devoured by brown tree snakes. (USDA)

In a test, this robot sucked up 15 lionfish in two days. The fish were later sold for food. (AP)

In a test, this robot sucked up 15 lionfish in two days. The fish were later sold for food. (AP)

The cleverly named “Magna Carpa” zaps invasive carp with electrical currents. (USFW)

The cleverly named “Magna Carpa” zaps invasive carp with electrical currents. (USFW)

Asian carp leap out of the Illinois River after being jolted by an electrical current. (AP)

Asian carp leap out of the Illinois River after being jolted by an electrical current. (AP)

Place Invaders

Posted: July 1, 2017

Burmese pythons lurk underwater in the Everglades. Brown tree snakes gobble up animals in Guam. Lionfish take over waters in Bermuda. Asian carp leap out of U.S. lakes into boats. What do these creatures have in common? They’re all part of the “I don’t belong here” club. In science, they’re called invasive species. Invasive species reproduce fast. They harm other creatures in their new homes.

When God designed the world, He made each kind of animal and plant to live in a certain place. In their proper homes, animals and plants have the food they need to survive. They also are food to other creatures. That keeps their populations from getting out of control.

Sometimes, people move creatures to new places by accident. Aquatic creatures cling to ships and are carried across the sea. Insects crawl into crates shipped around the world. Plants meant just for decoration end up in the wild and take root. In other cases (like the pet trade), people move the creatures on purpose.

Once, people had a perfect relationship with nature. That changed when Adam and Eve sinned. Now people struggle to take care of God’s creation. Often when they interfere with natural ecosystems, they end up with problems to fix.

Thankfully, people have God-given creativity to help them out. In Bermuda, they use robots to zap and vacuum up lionfish. In Guam, helicopters drop mice and Tylenol into trees to poison brown tree snakes. In the U.S. Midwest, boats with huge, winglike nets stun Asian carp. What creative idea will solve the python problem in Florida?