Mammut professional climbers carry backpacks equipped with six cameras to capture the 360 degree.

Mammut professional climbers carry backpacks equipped with six cameras to capture the 360 degree.

Map: From Noun to Verb

Posted: January 1, 2015

Once, map was a noun. We depended on maps, studied maps, and shoved maps into our cars’ glove compartments. But today “map” is a verb—something we do.

Did you know that people are mapping every detail of the world? They are, right down to your own driveway! That information used to go onto flat paper. Now it goes onto flat screens.

How does mapping work? Cameras mounted on cars capture 3-D views of neighborhoods. Satellites in orbit capture features of Earth’s surface—even the geography under the sea!

Professional mountain climbers Daniel Arnold and Stephan Siegrist are mapping—high up. They climbed Switzerland’s Eiger Mountain. They had digital cameras strapped to their backs. Now you can watch their climb at www. project360.mammut.ch. You’ll be able to see 360° around. That’s almost as good as being with them! How times have changed!

Once, explorers recorded star patterns and landforms. Those records guided others who would follow.

We all need help finding our way. Thankfully, we have the very best guide—God. He can guide our feet and our hearts. He doesn’t need a map. He made everything! The Psalmist knew this. He wrote, “If I go up to the heavens, you are there; if I make my bed in the depths, you are there. If I settle on the far side of the sea, even there your hand will guide me.” (Psalm 139: 8-10, NIV)