Why does your cat “knead” your tummy and other soft things? Maybe this motion comes from when it was nursing as a kitten—a leftover, comforting habit. (RB)

Why does your cat “knead” your tummy and other soft things? Maybe this motion comes from when it was nursing as a kitten—a leftover, comforting habit. (RB)

Why does your cat bring animals to you? Maybe they are gifts. Maybe she is trying to teach you to hunt too. (RB)

Why does your cat bring animals to you? Maybe they are gifts. Maybe she is trying to teach you to hunt too. (RB)

If you’ve tried giving a cat a bath, you know what a bad idea it is! Why? (RB)

If you’ve tried giving a cat a bath, you know what a bad idea it is! Why? (RB)

A cat’s instinct tells her that she’s much safer in a tight cubbyhole or den. (RB)

A cat’s instinct tells her that she’s much safer in a tight cubbyhole or den. (RB)

Maybe your cat bunts with her head to show that you are her person. (RB)

Maybe your cat bunts with her head to show that you are her person. (RB)

A cat might show her belly and all four clawed feet to say, “I’m ready to protect myself!” So that might not be a good time to give her a belly rub! (RB)

A cat might show her belly and all four clawed feet to say, “I’m ready to protect myself!” So that might not be a good time to give her a belly rub! (RB)

Why Does My Cat . . . ?

Posted: March 4, 2019

Why do you think cats purr? Only God knows for sure. He created them, after all. But we can make some pretty good guesses about why cats behave the way they do.

Why does my cat . . .

. . scratch everything? She’s not scratching the drapes to annoy you. She’s just giving herself a manicure! Dead nail growth falls off when cats scratch.

. . . dislike a belly rub? Sometimes a kitty enjoys a few strokes on its belly. Other times a displayed cat belly shows enemies every limb. It says, “I’m ready to use these to attack!”

. . . nudge me? There’s an official word for this: “bunting.” When a cat bunts, her head releases pheromones (chemicals). She does this to show that you are her person.

. . . paw at the floor? Many cats do this before they eat. Cat paws contain scent glands. When a cat paws at the ground she is leaving a message behind: “This is my turf!” The pawing could also be her instincts telling her to protect her food from predators by burying it.

. . hate a bath? If you’ve tried giving a cat a bath, you know what a bad idea it is! People have been taking care of cats for a long time, protecting them from rain and snow. They’re not used to water. Their fur also doesn’t dry easily, so getting soaked doesn’t feel comfortable. No worries though. God gave them a rough tongue for cleaning.

. . . “knead” my tummy? Your cat doesn’t need you. But she may knead you. She pushes out with her right paw then her left. Her claws extend. That tickles! We aren’t totally sure why cats do this to blankets, pillows, and people. But here’s a common guess. Kittens make this motion when they are nursing. It could just be a leftover, comforting habit.

. . . stare at me? When a cat stares, she may be trying to get your attention. When she blinks at you slowly over and over, she’s giving you good news: She likes and trusts you.

. . . bring home dead animals? Cats have kept most of their wild instincts. A mother cat teaches kittens how to survive in the wild by catching other animals. First, she drags home a completely dead animal. Then she drags home prey that’s still alive for kittens to kill themselves. So why does your cat bring animals to you? Maybe they are gifts. Maybe she is trying to teach you to hunt too.

. . . love to sit in small boxes? Does your cat sleep in a small box or in the tiny bathroom sink instead of on her new pet bed? That’s because cats learn in the wild to always be on the lookout for predators. A cat wouldn’t lay down in a wide open space where any enemy could find her. She feels much safer in a tight cubbyhole or den.

. . . stretch so much? Cats sleep a lot—about twice as much as people do. A cat brain paralyzes most of the cat’s muscles while the cat sleeps.  (Human brains do the same thing.) When cats wake up, they stretch. It feels as good to a cat as it does to you. And stretching gets blood flowing again.