Nick Vujicic speaks to a crowd of about 25,000 students and young people in Hanoi, Vietnam. (AP/Na Son Nguyen)

Nick Vujicic speaks to a crowd of about 25,000 students and young people in Hanoi, Vietnam. (AP/Na Son Nguyen)

President Roosevelt and friend Ruthie Bie pet his dog Fala in Hyde Park, New York.

President Roosevelt and friend Ruthie Bie pet his dog Fala in Hyde Park, New York.

Bryan, left, and Bradford Manning started a clothing company called Two Blind Brothers. They donate the profits to research into curing blindness. (AP/Jessie Wardarski)

Bryan, left, and Bradford Manning started a clothing company called Two Blind Brothers. They donate the profits to research into curing blindness. (AP/Jessie Wardarski)

Ludwig van Beethoven composed music even after losing his hearing.

Ludwig van Beethoven composed music even after losing his hearing.

Temple Grandin, who is autistic, is a professor of animal science. (AP/Charles Sykes)

Temple Grandin, who is autistic, is a professor of animal science. (AP/Charles Sykes)

Created with Purpose

Posted: March 1, 2021

Romans 12:10 says, “Love one another with brotherly affection. Outdo one another in showing honor.” That command is for everyone, and it isn’t happening only at Dignity Kitchen. It’s happening around the world! People with mental and physical disabilities are hard at work learning new things. They are finding value in the workplace. They also bring value to their communities by sharing their talents, time, and skills.

Some people are born with physical or mental disabilities. Two blind brothers have their own online clothing store. Bradford and Bryan Manning sell ultra-soft clothes. Their big company goal is to find a cure for blindness. Nick Vujicic is an energetic speaker and author. He was born without arms or legs. But he uses his mind and voice well. Hannah Sampson is a professional dancer who has Down Syndrome. Temple Grandin is autistic. She is a brilliant professor at Colorado State University.

Sometimes, disabilities develop later in life. Joni Eareckson Tada was paralyzed when she was 17. Now at age 71, she has been a Christian author and speaker, and a talented painter, for decades. She also hosts family camps for parents raising children with disabilities. The camps provide rest and encouragement.

Polio took away Franklin Roosevelt’s ability to walk. But it didn’t stop him from being president of the United States!

Ludwig van Beethoven began losing his hearing around age 26. He composed a masterpiece, his Ninth Symphony, without the ability to hear. Thomas Edison was deaf by his teen years. That didn’t prevent the inventor from creating the lightbulb or phonograph.

John 9:1-3 tells us that God has a purpose in disability. “As He passed by, He saw a man blind from birth. And His disciples asked Him, ‘Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?’ Jesus answered, ‘It was not that this man sinned, or his parents, but that the works of God might be displayed in him.’”

Look around! People with disabilities are outstanding teachers, lawyers, writers, cashiers, composers, assistants, lab technicians, artists, electricians, and so much more. That’s because God created every person with purpose. He allows everything, including challenging disabilities, for our good and for His glory.