Kids pick vegetables at a community garden in High Point, North Carolina. Have you ever watched a plant grow from a seed? (Laura Greene/The Enterprise via AP)

Kids pick vegetables at a community garden in High Point, North Carolina. Have you ever watched a plant grow from a seed? (Laura Greene/The Enterprise via AP)

Wildlife biologists Evan Grant, right, and Adrianne Brand gather red-spotted newts in Sunderland, Vermont. (AP/Jim Cole)

Wildlife biologists Evan Grant, right, and Adrianne Brand gather red-spotted newts in Sunderland, Vermont. (AP/Jim Cole)

Johnny Horne prepares to photograph a comet in Linville, North Carolina. He is an amateur astronomer. (AP/Gerry Broome)

Johnny Horne prepares to photograph a comet in Linville, North Carolina. He is an amateur astronomer. (AP/Gerry Broome)

A Danaus chrysippus or “plain tiger” butterfly feeds on a plant. (AP/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

A Danaus chrysippus or “plain tiger” butterfly feeds on a plant. (AP/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

A bird eats seeds out of a snow-covered feeder in Olympia, Washington. (AP/Ted S. Warren)

A bird eats seeds out of a snow-covered feeder in Olympia, Washington. (AP/Ted S. Warren)

Take a Good Look!

Posted: May 1, 2021

Science is everywhere! That’s because science is a body of knowledge about the natural world. It is made up of all the principles God designed to make His creation work. Psalm 19:1 says, “The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims His handiwork.”

Look outside and you see God’s creation come to life. Itty-bitty insects scurry. Seeds grow into strong, flowering plants. Stars sparkle in the night. Weather patterns change. Winds spread seeds and stir up animal activity. Natural disasters disturb ecosystems. Over time, they heal and rebuild. It’s an active creation! Studying that activity helps us understand God the Creator, who made it all in His wisdom. 

Watch a flitting butterfly. Follow it a bit and see if it lands. Scientists study butterflies. They learn about their habitats (where they live). They try to understand the survival skills God gave them.

Scan for salamanders in a creek. Can you find one? By observing creeks, scientists learn about the many organisms that thrive in fresh water. Some are easy to spot––like turtles and snails, frogs and snakes. Below the surface, more organisms that may be harder to see live. Think of algae and bacteria. But they all work together. God brings order to these natural communities.

Take a nature hike! Scientists go on hikes to collect samples of soil, water, animal waste, rocks, and much more. God filled the Earth with the exact natural resources that life needs to thrive.

Pay attention to wild animals when a storm is coming. Some biologists track birds flying through massive storms. Fletcher Smith is a research biologist at the Center for Conservation Biology in Williamsburg, Virginia. He says, “They’ll just sit on a tree branch and hold on for dear life. Most birds ride out storms that way. When they grip something, it’s easier to stay gripped than it is to let go.”

God keeps delicate birds safe during strong storms. How much more does God care for you! Luke 12:7 says, “Fear not; you are of more value than many sparrows.”

All creation reflects the beauty, order, and creativity of our Creator. And the best part of creation––YOU! God made you His masterpiece.