Did you know that stars have life cycles? We’ll look at the cycles of “average stars” and “massive stars.” Both start here. A nebula is a giant cloud of gas and dust. Some nebulae are regions where new stars form. (Krieg Barrie)

Did you know that stars have life cycles? We’ll look at the cycles of “average stars” and “massive stars.” Both start here. A nebula is a giant cloud of gas and dust. Some nebulae are regions where new stars form. (Krieg Barrie)

Some new stars are medium-sized “average stars” (left). When an average star uses up its hydrogen, its core collapses into itself and becomes hotter. That makes the star expand. It is now called a “red giant” (right). (Krieg Barrie)

Some new stars are medium-sized “average stars” (left). When an average star uses up its hydrogen, its core collapses into itself and becomes hotter. That makes the star expand. It is now called a “red giant” (right). (Krieg Barrie)

As the red giant burns through fuel, it becomes a “planetary nebula” (left). Then some stars become small, heavy “white dwarfs” (top right). Other stars become small, dense “neutron stars.” (Krieg Barrie)

As the red giant burns through fuel, it becomes a “planetary nebula” (left). Then some stars become small, heavy “white dwarfs” (top right). Other stars become small, dense “neutron stars.” (Krieg Barrie)

“Massive stars” (left) are much larger and have more mass than average stars. A massive star burns through its hydrogen faster than an average star, turning into a “red supergiant” (right). (Krieg Barrie)

“Massive stars” (left) are much larger and have more mass than average stars. A massive star burns through its hydrogen faster than an average star, turning into a “red supergiant” (right). (Krieg Barrie)

When the red supergiant runs out of fuel, it collapses and then explodes! The explosion is called a “supernova” (left). Sometimes a supernova becomes a “black hole” (right). Other times, a neutron star is produced. (Krieg Barrie)

When the red supergiant runs out of fuel, it collapses and then explodes! The explosion is called a “supernova” (left). Sometimes a supernova becomes a “black hole” (right). Other times, a neutron star is produced. (Krieg Barrie)

Bizarre, Beautiful Space

Posted: September 1, 2021

Can you spot a supernova? How many stars are in the sky?

How much would a neutron star weigh? How far can a black hole stretch?

What causes sunspots? Are asteroids loud?

How long is a light year? Does space dust disappear?

How much ice is in a comet?

Do constellations ever stop shining? Are wormholes real?

Does solar wind blow forever? How hot does the Sun get?

Colossians 1:17 says, “And He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together.” That includes the entire universe! God spoke and space came into being. The marvelous universe He created is filled with things we can hardly begin to understand. Some we can see, like our warm, bright Sun and the glimmering stars. Others we can’t, like black holes and Oort clouds. (That’s a band of billions of icy objects that exist at the edge of our solar system.)

The Bible tells us about creation, and science—the study of that creation—helps us understand it and learn more about the God who made it. Genesis 1:16 says, “And God made the two great lights––the greater light to rule the day and the lesser light to rule the night––and the stars.” A nebula is a large dust cloud in space. God takes that dust and forms stars and planets. The Horsehead Nebula is a small dark nebula. Can you guess what astronomers thought it looked like?

A black hole is created when a humongous star collapses. The result is a swirling vortex of gravity—so much gravity that even light cannot escape. Neutron stars are small and very dense. They are heavier than the Sun! Neutron stars are created when giant stars die.

Can you imagine that the God who created black holes and neutron stars is the same God who created YOU?

When I look at your heavens, the work of your fingers, the Moon and stars, which you have set in place, what is man that you are mindful of him, and the son of man that you care for him? — Psalm 8:3-4