A miner shows diamonds found in an abandoned mine in Areinha, Brazil. (AP/Felipe Dana)

A miner shows diamonds found in an abandoned mine in Areinha, Brazil. (AP/Felipe Dana)

A diamond mine in Aikhal, Russia

A diamond mine in Aikhal, Russia

A diamond miner displays a piece of kimberlite rock that may contain diamonds in Mirny, Russia. (AP/Mikhail Metzel)

A diamond miner displays a piece of kimberlite rock that may contain diamonds in Mirny, Russia. (AP/Mikhail Metzel)

Blue diamond and pink diamond earrings on display at Sotheby’s in London, England (AP/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Blue diamond and pink diamond earrings on display at Sotheby’s in London, England (AP/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Diamonds can be used in tools, like this Bosch diamond tipped drill bit. (Bosch)

Diamonds can be used in tools, like this Bosch diamond tipped drill bit. (Bosch)

Where Do Diamonds Come From?

Posted: March 1, 2022

Yes, diamonds can come from space. But most of the diamonds people have found originated on Earth. Or, rather, in Earth. For diamonds to form, carbon must meet extreme heat and pressure. This happens far below Earth’s surface—around 100 miles deep!

How did those deep diamonds get to us? Ancient volcanic activity pushed them to the surface. These eruptions created something called kimberlite pipes. These pipe-shaped structures sometimes contain diamonds. But not all the time. Not even usually. A diamond is always a rare find—even in a kimberlite pipe.

When diamonds shoot up to Earth’s surface, they sometimes mix with tiny amounts of other minerals. This changes a diamond’s color. Most commonly, diamonds sparkle with a bit of yellow or brown. More rarely, they’ll be tinged with blue, orange, pink, red, or green. If you dig up a purely colorless diamond, congratulations. You’re holding the rarest diamond type of all.

Diamonds look glass-like. But they’re far from fragile. Nothing can scratch a diamond except another diamond. That explains why the word diamond comes from the Greek word for “indestructible.” This is also part of the reason diamonds have value. They can be used in tools such as drills and saws.

But much of the diamond’s value comes from its rarity. What if diamonds were amassed all over the world like mountains? What if they covered the beaches like sand? The material would still be useful for its strength, of course. But it wouldn’t be nearly so costly.

 

Wisdom is knowing and obeying the God who made everything. This is the most precious possession of all—more than gemstones!

If you call out for insight and raise your voice for understanding, if you seek it like silver and search for it as for hidden treasures, then you will understand the fear of the Lord and find the knowledge of God. — Proverbs 2:3-5