Brittany Goff poses with the blue truck that she uses as a mobile flower stand. Her business is called the Petal Wagon. (Courtesy of Brittany Goff)

Brittany Goff poses with the blue truck that she uses as a mobile flower stand. Her business is called the Petal Wagon. (Courtesy of Brittany Goff)

Mrs. Goff holds a bunch of tulips. (Courtesy of Brittany Goff)

Mrs. Goff holds a bunch of tulips. (Courtesy of Brittany Goff)

Customers can build their own bouquets. (Courtesy of Brittany Goff)

Customers can build their own bouquets. (Courtesy of Brittany Goff)

The Goffs live in an old farmhouse on their flower farm. (Courtesy of Brittany Goff)

The Goffs live in an old farmhouse on their flower farm. (Courtesy of Brittany Goff)

The flower farm is called The Petal Manor. (Courtesy of Brittany Goff)

The flower farm is called The Petal Manor. (Courtesy of Brittany Goff)

A Farm of Flowers

Posted: July 1, 2022

Welcome to the Petal Wagon. Build your own bouquet!

In the spring of 2021, Brittany Goff wanted to bring cheer to her corner of the world during the pandemic. She started a mobile flower stand called the Petal Wagon.

Mrs. Goff pulled up to coffee shops or local farms near Virginia Beach, Virginia. Customers walked right up to her blue Honda Acty truck to buy flowers.

 Zinnias, bachelor’s buttons, garden roses, and gerbera daisies sold between $1 and $7 per stem. Mrs. Goff also delivered flowers to local subscribers. She even drove her truck to weddings so guests could make their own bouquets as favors.

This spring, Mrs. Goff and her family took their flowers a step further. They opened their own flower farm in Suffolk, Virginia: The Petal Manor.

The Goff family has been figuring out how to bring an old farm back to life—including restoring their farmhouse, which is 124 years old.

To launch their farm, the Goffs needed creativity, good planning, and persistence. The Bible tells us that “the grass withers, the flower fades, but the word of our God will stand forever.” (Isaiah 40:8) Mrs. Goff sees that firsthand. As she plants, tends, and harvests, she has to remember that each blooming flower will have a very short life. So she keeps planting! She tries to sow a new round every week so she can have blooms all season long.

The Goffs grew tulips, daffodils, ranunculus, snapdragons, statice, dianthus, and carnations this spring.

But they weren’t done. Far from it! Next came planting time for sunflowers, zinnias, and cosmos. These flowers will be ready in high summer. Customers can build their own bouquet right from Mrs. Goff’s fields.

Why? Short-lived flowers show us that God cares about beauty, and that He keeps renewing it in our world—just as His mercies are new every day.