A girl tries out one of Blimey’s virtual reality headsets. Blimey has created a virtual reality tour of the Holy Land. (Blimey handout)

A girl tries out one of Blimey’s virtual reality headsets. Blimey has created a virtual reality tour of the Holy Land. (Blimey handout)

The Holy Land tour is made from videos and models. (Blimey handout)

The Holy Land tour is made from videos and models. (Blimey handout)

A man prays at the Western Wall. (123RF)

A man prays at the Western Wall. (123RF)

A view of the Dome of the Rock shrine at the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem (AP/Mahmoud Illean)

A view of the Dome of the Rock shrine at the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem (AP/Mahmoud Illean)

Some people believe that Jesus was buried at this spot. The Holy Sepulchre church is built on top. (123RF)

Some people believe that Jesus was buried at this spot. The Holy Sepulchre church is built on top. (123RF)

Jerusalem in 360

Posted: November 1, 2022

Would you like to “walk where Jesus walked” . . . without leaving your couch?

Now you can. Just strap on a virtual reality (VR) headset.

A company called Blimey made a new gadget that can make you feel like you’re really in what many people call “The Holy Land.” (The Holy Land lies on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea. It is in present-day Israel and Palestine.)

Put on the helmet. Through the goggles, you see 360-degree views of Jerusalem. These are made from videos and models. They’re designed to make you feel like you’re really there. You can even listen to locals talk. These people are 3-D holograms, and you’re a tourist in Israel. (You just happen to still be in your pajamas!)

People belonging to different religions prize the Holy Land. Muslims take pilgrimages to Jerusalem. Jewish people see it as their religious home. Christians value it because Jesus was crucified, buried, resurrected, and ascended to heaven there.

VR tourists can visit Al-Aqsa Mosque, a holy site of Islam. They can see the Western Wall, which is part of an ancient Jewish temple. They can even join a ceremony at the Holy Sepulchre. Some believe Jesus was buried at this spot.

Participants can also join a game that allows them to open doors, lay a hand on a place called Jesus’ tomb, and place a prayer note at the Western Wall.

Nimrod Shanit runs the Blimey company. He remembers visiting the Holy Land as a child. He wants others to have that chance, even if they can’t hop on a plane.

Why? We don’t have to see every spot Jesus walked to believe in Him. But we can see these places because they’re real and He’s real.