Most people in Chad are farmers. (AP/Susan Linnee)

Most people in Chad are farmers. (AP/Susan Linnee)

The Tibesti Mountains are in northwestern Chad. (AP)

The Tibesti Mountains are in northwestern Chad. (AP)

Musicians play long kakaki horns. (Carol Beckwith & Angela Fisher)

Musicians play long kakaki horns. (Carol Beckwith & Angela Fisher)

Many people in Chad are Muslim. (AP/Sunday Alamba)

Many people in Chad are Muslim. (AP/Sunday Alamba)

This sign tells people where to vote. It is in both French and Arabic. (AP/Abakar Mahamad)

This sign tells people where to vote. It is in both French and Arabic. (AP/Abakar Mahamad)

Passport to Chad

Posted: November 1, 2022

Ready to take a trip? Let’s learn more about life in this African country.

Jobs

Not everyone in Chad lives as a nomad. Most farm. Some grow cotton or raise cattle. Some make a living catching fish in Lake Chad. Many are desperately poor.

Population

Some parts of the world are packed with people. Not Chad. This agricultural country has about 20 people per square mile.

Beliefs

What do people in Chad believe? Imagine 10 people from Chad standing in a line. Five are Muslim. Two are Roman Catholic. Two are Protestant. The last one is a mix of “other” and “none.”

Learning

Now picture 10 kids from Chad. Five attend school. Five don’t. Officials struggle to get kids into school in a large country where people are so spread out. What would your country be like if half the kids didn’t get an education?

Languages

Come again? More than 100 different languages and dialects (versions of a language) are spoken in Chad! This includes the two official languages: Arabic and French. (Chad has a nickname: “Babel tower.” Can you guess why? Genesis 11 might give you a hint.)

Capital City

N’Djamena (pronounced uhn-jah-MAY-nuh)

Size

Chad is about eight times smaller than the United States. But it is the fifth largest country in Africa.

Headed to Chad anytime soon?

Enjoy a camel race in the Tibesti Mountains. Sweat it out in the Sahara Desert. Spot a northeast African cheetah. Listen to the kakaki (cuh-KAH-key), a 10-foot horn played at royal ceremonies.